Can agricultural research help feed the world?

Linked on our blogs with La faim n’est pas une fatalité, and with Jean Ziegler, Switzerland. – Published on Nourishing the Planet, by Carlos Pérez del Castillo, December 15, 2011.

On 10th December, Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, Leymah Gbowee and Tawakkul Karman were awarded the 2011 Nobel Peace prize for their non-violent struggle for the safety of women and women’s rights. Past recipients of this renowned award include the likes of Nelson Mandela, the Dalai Lama and Mother Teresa. So it may sound surprising that back in 1970 it was awarded to a plant scientist named Norman Borlaug. 

Leymah Gbowee and Tawakkul Karman were awarded the 2011 Nobel Peace prize for their non-violent struggle for the safety of women and women’s rights. Past recipients of this renowned award include the likes of Nelson Mandela, the Dalai Lama and Mother Teresa. So it may sound surprising that back in 1970 it was awarded to a plant scientist named Norman Borlaug … //

…The future of our agricultural research:

Borlaug once said: Food is the moral right of all who are born into this world. We have recently welcomed the 7th billion human on earth but sadly 1 billion are still going to bed hungry each day.

At the CGIAR we stand ready to continue the work initiated by Borlaug and countless other pioneers to boost food production, while maintaining our environmental heritage for future generations.

A strategic reform of our system will ensure that our research is better coordinated, more efficient, and focused on delivering results.

But agricultural research cannot feed the world on its own. All agriculture stakeholders need to work in partnership: local governments, civil society, the private sector and the farmers.

Working collaboratively with global partners, the CGIAR has established 15 international research programs (CGIAR Research Programs) that put smallholder farmers and the environment at the center of the research. We focus on delivering innovations, better practices and knowledge to millions while prioritizing climate change and gender.

That is how we see agricultural research making a more food secure world. And a more peaceful world. In the spirit of the 1970 Nobel Peace prize, that was given to Norman Borlaug.

(full long text).

(My comment: Nice good projects, but look, when people are too poor to buy your newly created wonderes, your effort will deepen the gap between poor and the real poorest. More, you must not allow developping country gov’s make money by selling your creations to poor, as poor have to receive it for free, but rather push away these corrupt govs).

Links:

Jean Ziegler: This World Order is not only murderous, it is absurd, November 18, 2008.

Jean Ziegler on de.wikipedia;

also on en.wikipedia: … As a United Nations official, Ziegler has dealt with both general worldwide issues such as the use of biofuels, as well as country-specific issues. Regarding the former, Ziegler has criticised the uptake of biofuels because their production can come at the expense of growing food. On 26 October 2007 Ziegler told a news conference at the UN that it’s a crime against humanity to convert agricultural productive soil into soil … which will be burned into biofuel… What has to be stopped is … the growing catastrophe of the massacre (by) hunger in the world …

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